Seasons Greetings & Happy Holidays

Vision Rehabilitation Services of GA wishes each and every one of you very Happy Holidays!  May the time you spend with family and friends warm your hearts and remain with you always.  VRS looks forward to the New Year and being able to serve our clients and their families.  We also appreciate our sponsors and supporters in all they do to help our efforts.

In observance of the Holidays, VRS will be closing at 1pm ET today.  We will remain closed Monday, December 25th, and Tuesday, December 26th.  We will reopen, Wednesday, December 27th!

Four-Part Christmas Plan For Diabetics

Christmas bellsIt’s the Christmas season and those with diabetes should approach the season with thoughtful planning in order to maintain healthy blood sugar levels and keep up with hard-earned healthy habits.  Creating a four-part plan for eating, drinking, traveling and activity at Christmas is one strategy recommended by the American Diabetes Association.  VRS instructors can assist you in developing your holiday plan – feel free to contact us at any time with questions:

Holiday Eating Plan:

American holidays are typically celebrated with excess food, so it is important to have an eating plan for maintaining healthy glucose levels Holiday Eating plan graphicthroughout the season.

  • Communicate your dietary needs to the event host
  • Offer to bring healthy alternatives to add to the menu
  • Have a high protein snack earlier in the day to avoid arriving hungry at the event

How to cut calories, without compromising on taste:

  • Remove the skin and eat light-colored meat (breast) rather than dark meat (thigh)
  • Make low-carb pigs in a blanket. Use low-fat cocktail sausages and pierce the skins. Instead of wrapping in bread, wrap with lean back-bacon (with the excess fat trimmed off) and grill. Do not fry or bake
  • Roast your potatoes; minimize fat by dry-roasting or using spray oil
  • Use vegetarian sausage rather than high-fat, high-calorie sausage meat in your stuffing
  • Keep to the healthy plate rule: 2/3 of your plate should be vegetables
  • Be extra cautious with dessert. Check out this link for dessert ideas. https://www.rd.com/food/recipes-cooking/diabetes-friendly-holiday-desserts/

If you have a higher blood glucose level than normal due to overindulging or changing your routine; don’t worry too much as this shouldn’t affect your long-term diabetes control.  Do aim to avoid persistently high readings in order to avoid compromising your hard-earned healthy habits.

Holiday Drinking Guidelines:

Holiday Drinking guidelines graphicAlcohol intake can lower blood glucose levels and increase the risk of a hypoglycemia incident.  Check with your doctor or pharmacist regarding how your prescriptions interact with alcohol and adjust your intake accordingly.

  • Diabetic men should have a maximum of 3-4 units of alcohol
  • Diabetic women a maximum of 2-3 units
  • Alternate between alcoholic and diet soft drinks or water can help limit the amount of alcohol you consume and keep you hydrated
  • Reduce calories and alcohol units by consuming lower strength wine
  • Do not to drink on an empty stomach – this can cause a low blood sugar event

Holiday Travel Tips:

Travelling with diabetes requires some extra planning and, at times, extra luggage!  List the items needed for your journey; keep an extra copy on your device or with a loved-one.

Travel Tips graphic

  • Always take extra supplies in case of an emergency
  • Plan for the unexpected: storm and airline delays may require longer stays
  • Bring extra insulin, meters, strips, pump supplies, alcohol wipes and Skin Tac wipes. You may also want to bring additional ketone urine strips. Use a Frio or other cooling bag for carrying insulin.
  • If you are flying, plan for extra time to go through security
  • Get a medical note saying you are allowed to carry diabetes- related supplies onto the airplane
  • Carry all of your supplies onto the plane – just in case
  • Divide supplies between bags, perhaps between other family members, in case a bag gets lost
  • Find out about special precautions from your insulin pump company Most insulin pumps and CGMs cannot be removed and sent through the x-ray machine.
  • Wear a medical ID necklace or bracelet
  • Carry a list of your doctors’ phone numbers with you
  • Have a back-up plan. Always carry syringes even if you are on a pump; if your pump fails you will be okay
  • Carry Ziplock bags in case something needs to be put in ice so it doesn’t get all wet (such as a pump or insulin bottles)
  • Carry candy, granola bars, glucose tabs, and other low blood sugar foods
  • Carry extra batteries for your pump/meter if needed

 

Keeping Active during the Holidays:Keeping active graphic

There are lots of easy and fun ways to add in some extra physical activities during the holiday season.  Grab a family member up off the couch and check some of these off your list:

  • Take a brisk walk with your family after your holiday meal.
  • Dance to holiday music.
  • Go ice skating at a local or pop up ice rink.
  • Shoot a few hoops
  • Enjoy the colors or smells with a holiday hike
  • Walk the neighborhood and look at lights
  • Take a caroling walk in the neighborhood

Introducing activity into your holiday season can help control both blood sugar levels and blood pressure.  It also helps us make memories with our families and friends that will last a lifetime. Take some time to make your plan for staying healthy over the holiday season and then go enjoy!

holly

Client Holiday Party

It was our pleasure to host the annual VRS Holiday Party today.  While the weather was not working with us, we still had a great turn out, wonderful food, and a fabulous entertainment.

Food

Our guests were treated to a traditional holiday meal of ham, turkey, and all the trimmings.  We would like to thank Belinda Green of Akoma Events for catering our event and weathering the roads to deliver our delicious meal!!

Big Room U table

We had some fun holding a raffle where a number of gift baskets were won as well as a beautiful wreath.  We’d like to thank Cook’s Christmas Trees for the wreath donation.  They are setup right across the street on South Cobb Drive for those still looking for a Christmas tree, wreath, or other holiday décor.

 

We were also grateful to be able to send a mini key lime pie home with each guest thanks to the support and donation from Kenny’s Great Pies.  Kenny’s is a great alternative for your holiday pies and offer a varietyBig Room tables of flavors if key lime is not on your list.  We also enjoyed the live entertainment from Tina Knight, who’s voice was beautiful!

Many thanks to everyone who joined us today!  The VRS staff and Board wish each and every one of you a very Merry Holiday Season and Happy New Year!

snowing at party

Happy Thanksgiving!

Thanksgiving-clip-art-thanksgiving-clipart-download-free-clipartcow

Vision Rehabilitation Services of GA wishes a very Happy Thanksgiving to one and all!  As families and friends gather and share past memories while making new ones, we at VRS wish you a day of happiness and gratefulness.  We are thankful for our clients and the ability to assist when needed.  Our capability to be there for our clients is not possible without our sponsors and supporters who we are very appreciative to and thankful for having.  With much gratitude, Happy Thanksgiving!

In observance of Thanksgiving, VRS will be closed Thursday, November 23rd, and Friday, November 24th.  We will reopen, Monday, November 27th!

November is American Diabetes Month – Did you know…

November is American Diabetes Month, a month set aside to educate the general public about this serious, and sometimes debilitating disease. One of the leading causes of disability and death in the United States, diabetes can cause blindness, nerve damage, kidney disease, and other health problems if it’s not controlled.

Diabetes#1causeofblindnessOne in 10 Americans have diabetes — that’s more than 30 million people. Another 84 million adults in the United States are at high risk of developing type 2 diabetes.

Fortunately, people who are at high risk for type 2 diabetes can lower their risk by more than half if they make healthy changes in their life – such as eating healthy, getting more physical activity, and losing weight. Those with diabetes in their family tree should be especially aggressive about making these changes as the risk of diabetes increases dramatically based on genetics.

Here are some tips for “tackling” Thanksgiving, football, and diabetes:

One of the most important considerations for those of us managing our diabetes or similar health issues, is to keep your blood sugars balanced during the day. Stable blood sugars ensure that your visual functioning remains consistent and at its best. The most effective way to balance blood sugars is to eat vegetables and proteins. So, on Thanksgiving Day, plan to eat small balanced meals at your regular meal times –breakfast and lunch –before the big dinner meal. Enjoy your Thanksgiving dinner by eating small portions of the food available for the meal. Leave the leftovers. Go back to your normal healthy eating the next day. It’s also an excellent idea to get up and move a little. Take an after meal walk and reminisce with loved ones,  stand up, stretch, and move during commercial breaks of the football and basketball games or better yet, go outside and toss the football yourself with the kids!

Even if you are already a diabetic, you can limit the progression and impact of the disease by carefully monitoring your health and following your doctor’s plan of action to diligently treat your diabetes. Further information about the prevention and treatment of this disease can be found on the American Diabetes Association website at www.diabetes.org.

Attention ALL Adults – Have you had your immunizations?

Living Well with Diabetes and Vision Loss is a United Way of Metropolitan Atlanta sponsored program run by VRS. Each month we work to provide information that we feel is helpful to those living with diabetes and vision loss.

Diabetes is a metabolic disorder that affects how the body uses food for energy due to insulin resistance. Diabetes affects the metabolism as well as the immune system. The disease causes the immune system to destroy insulin producing cells within the pancreas. The immune response is also much lower in people who have diabetes so they are more susceptible to getting infections that could result in the loss of a limb.

Many of us will remember the days of toting our children to the doctor to get their recommended immunizations and protect them from various diseases. As adults, however, we often neglect much needed vaccinations which are recommended and help prevent dangerous and sometimes deadly diseases. To stay protected against serious illnesses, adults need to get vaccinated too. Shots such as the flu vaccine, are recommended annually for all adults and other shots such as the pneumonia or Shingles vaccine may also be recommended by your doctor.

Take this short quiz below to determine what shots you may need to take, then talk to your doctor about each. Don’t neglect the steps you need to take to be at optimal health.

The Adult Vaccine Quiz from the CDC: https://www2.cdc.gov/nip/adultImmSched/

To stay healthy this winter also be sure to eat well, get some exercise and plenty of sleep. The immune system fights best for you when it is healthy and taken care of. Allow for time with family or friends playing games or sharing stories and leisure activities. Laugh a lot. Our emotional health is tied directly to our immune system and when we feel a part of a community our immune system works its best.

VRS benefits from Whitefield Great Day of Service

VRS benefits from Whitefield Great Day of Service

Vision Rehabilitation Services of Georgia extends a big “THANK YOU” to Whitefield Academy and the great work completed at the office this past Saturday, August 26th.  Whitfield Academy students and parents revamped the flower beds are VRS entrance as part of their Great Day of Service.

Picture of the Whitefield GroupWhitefield launched Whitefield Great Day of Service just this month.  They shared “This event is centered on coming together as a Pack and starting off the school year with a focus on “others ahead of self.””  When asked “Why is Whitefield starting a Great Day of Service?”  They responded, “We want to create a way for the entire Whitefield community to come together as a family and focus on “others ahead of self” as we start a new school year. There’s no better way to center our hearts and minds on Christ than to serve others! Our goal is to make this an annual tradition at the beginning of each school year.”
“VRS is blessed by their service and have a partnership of many years with Whitfield Academy.  They did a beautiful job on the flowers and we are most appreciative” Sharon Croyle, VRS CEO/Executive Director, stated.
Flowerbed 1
Flowerbed 2
Flowerbed 3
Transition Academy Visits Local Businesses in the Community

Transition Academy Visits Local Businesses in the Community

On Tuesday, July 11, 2017, the Transition Academy (“TA”) visited an assisted living & memory care community in Smyrna, Provident Village at Creekside, and a local entrepreneur’s privately-owned framing business, Annie Frame Will Do.   The goals of the visits were to understand the various jobs and career opportunities available and practice the informational interview skills taught in TA.   By visiting a corporately structured entity and a privately owned & operated business on the same day, TA participants could compare and contrast different business approaches, skill sets required, risks, time commitments and rewards.

At Provident Village, following opening remarks, each TA member introduced themselves to the staff by discussing the details of their unique eye conditions and asking informational interview questions.   Through this question and answer period students were able to find out more about how an assisted living facility is operated.

The TA spoke with Allison Mosely and Carrie Chau, who are members of Provident’s sales and marketing team.  Their job is to intFrom left to right, Carrie Chau and Allison Moselyroduce potential residents to the Provident community.   Through organized special events and personalized appointments, Allison & Carrie get potential residents and their families excited about undergoing a lifestyle change and moving into Provident Village.  According to Carrie, Provident offers seniors a wide range of services.  These include cooking/dining, housekeeping, transportation, and entertaining social activities.   A key point is the residents of Provident retain the ability to make their own decisions about what they eat and how active a life they lead.  The sole exception to this rule concerns residents in the memory care area of the community who have a history of Dementia or Alzheimer’s and move into Provident Village specifically for a secure, structured, care taking environment.

The class also met Provident Village’s business manager (Natasha) who manages the community’s budget, processes paperwork for the new residents, bills the residents, and performs human resource duties for all the employees.  Once the explanations were finished, Natasha led thefrom left to right, Natasha and Nicky TA group on a tour of the building.  We saw many exciting sights such as the residential dining rooms, the library, and an entertainment center where the residents could watcfrom left to right, Elaine Austin and Allison Moselyh movies and eat popcorn.  In addition, the executive director (Elaine Austin) showed us the memory care unit.  We did not enter this secure area as it is locked & contains many alarms to prevent patients from accidentally wandering out of the building or becoming lost.  Other staff members who shared details of their positions and what it takes to keep Provident running efficiently and effectively included Nikki at the reception desk and front door; Carla from housekeeping; Penny the Activities Director; and Asia who is one of multiple chefs.

After lunch, the TA group bid the staff of Provident goodbye and rode to visit Ann Chamblee, a local entreprenuer.   Today, Ann runs her business from the basement of her house and averages a six day per week, ten-hour work day.   However, she used to be a business manager for the army.  While working for the army in Texas, Ann ran an arts and crafts center where she fell in love with framing.  So, after moving to Georgia, Ann started a business of her own, Annie Frame Will Do.Ann the owner of Annie Frame Will Do

Ann was very forthcoming with information when asked about how she creates frames, stocks inventory, and gains business.  She shared details about tracking the business expenses, planning for meeting deadlines, and how to create pricing structures.  The take away was the fact there is a lot to do when running your own business.

Ann’s business specializes in picture framing and framTA Students holding their t-shirts from Annie Frame Will Doe repair, but she has recently begun printing t-shirts as well.   The best part of the visit for most was getting the opportunity to see Ann create our Transition Academy t-shirts in her workshop using a fabric printer, a computer, and an iron.  She utilized the TA logo designed a few weeks back at the beginning of TA.  Annie was extremely generous so as to let us have the t-shirts free of charge.
All in all, the Transition Academy had a very full day and learned a lot.  We truly appreciate the support of these two businesses and the time spent with the class.

Article from The Economist – White Cane 2.0

Interesting article from The Economist regarding White Cane alternative.

This article appeared in the Science and technology section of the print edition under the headline “White cane 2.0”

Helping blind people navigate

White cane 2.0

A new way to assist those with poor eyesight

Dr Rus’s device, of which she demonstrated a prototype on June 1st at the International Conference on Robotics and Automation in Singapore, consists of a camera worn on a lanyard around the neck, and a belt. A computer inside the camera creates a three-dimensional image of the area ahead of the wearer, processes it to extract relevant information, and uses the results to pass on appropriate signals via the belt.

Dr Rus knew from previous attempts to build devices of this sort that what might seem the obvious way of manifesting those signals, namely as sounds with specific meanings, was not, in fact, a good approach. Blind people depend a lot on their hearing and do not like it when newfangled devices hamper this sense with beeps and clicks. Hence the belt, which has five vibrating motors installed in it. One sits over the centre of the wearer’s abdomen. The others flank this central motor, with two spaced out on either side of it.

That configuration permits the computer to warn a wearer when he is on a collision course with an obstacle. It does so by telling the motor pointing most closely in the direction of the obstacle to vibrate. If the wearer is walking towards a wall, for example, the central motor vibrates softly when he comes within a couple of metres of it. If he ignores this, perhaps because he actually wants to reach the wall, the computer increases the amplitude as he closes in, giving him a good idea of exactly how far away he is. Similarly, if he is in danger of bumping, say, his right shoulder on a door frame while walking from one room to another, the right-most motor on the belt will warn him of the impending collision. And it works. When compared with navigation by white cane in one of MIT’s famously crowded hallways, it reduced blind students’ collisions with others by 86%.

The new system can, however, do more than just help someone walk around without collisions, for the belt incorporates a touchpad that is inscribed with instructions in Braille. This permits the user to program it to perform specific tasks.

For example, Dr Rus knew that blind students often struggle to find an empty seat in a crowded lecture theatre. Adding an appropriate algorithm to the computer’s software helps get around this by enabling it to recognise chairs, and also whether or not a chair is occupied. In this case, the motors are used to indicate a direction to be travelled in, rather than one to be avoided. Activating the algorithm using the touchpad causes the motor pointing most closely towards an empty chair to vibrate when the system spots one.

Good vibrations

In trials involving a room that contained an empty chair, an occupied chair and also a recycling bin, the algorithm directed the belt-wearer straight to the empty chair 80% of the time. Cane users presented with the same arrangement always found the empty chair eventually, but in doing so came into contact with objects other than their target more than five times as often as those using the camera and belt.

Whether a camera (ideally, smaller than the one in the prototype) and a belt could replace a cane completely remains to be seen. In particular, Dr Rus’s system does lack one important feature of Biggs’s innovation. A white cane not only helps a blind person to navigate, it also signals his condition to the rest of the world, allowing others to adjust their behaviour accordingly. As a supplementary aid, however, her approach seems most promising.

VRS Diabetes Support Group Put the Pedal to Metal at Cycle Élan

Cycle Élan gave VRS Diabetes Support Group and staff a warm welcome during their beginner’s cycling class June 22, 2017. VRS enjoyed a private 30-minute high-energy cycling class complete with great music and lots of motivation from the instructor, April. Each client was provided a cycle that tracked their progress, displayed their speed, distance traveled and more.  April encouraged everyone to work at their own pace but not be afraid to push themselves. Everyone seemed to push themselves not only to complete the 30 minutes but to increase their tension levels and speeds.  Assan, another Cycle Élan instructor, cruised the studio to ask each client how they were doing and to encourage them to do what felt comfortable.  VRS client, Derrick Whitaker, felt comfortable cycling at high speed and high tension. He breezed through the cycling class with ease, earning the longest distance of all the cyclists. Admittedly, Derrick spends a lot of time at the gym and had a clear advantage over those who were not as experienced.  He was an inspiration to all to really put the petal to the metal.

VRS Diabetes Support Group Puts the Pedal to the MetalWay to go Derrick !

After 30 minutes, the Diabetes Support Group accumulated several miles of distance and burned a major amount of calories. After class, Cycle Élan provided cold eucalyptus-scented towels to help cool body temperatures. After blood sugar levels were checked, the class enjoyed some snacks and conversation about how much fun the class was.  Everyone seemed pleased with their progress and encouraged to engage in a fitness routine.

VRs Diabetes Support Group Puts the Pedal to the Metal

VRS Diabetes Class Puts the Pedal to the Metal

Some even said they would return to Cycle Élan for more classes.  Why not? The facilities, instructors, classes and hospitality were great!  VRS would like to extend a big thank you to Cycle Élan for welcoming the VRS Diabetes Support Group and helping to inspire to get the wheels moving toward fitness.

 

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