From an anonymous submitter…

“The truth is that I have always hated talking about nutrition. This was mostly because I wasn’t good at it; I wasn’t one of those people who loved nutritious snacks and grabbed an apple out of the fridge if I was hungry. My mother made me cinnamon toast on white bread for a snack. My first instinct was always to grab potato chips or chocolate bars as snacks. After years of growing up with this pattern, how could I not be pounds and pounds overweight and physically weak. When my diabetic mother came to live with us, and she began struggling with all the repercussions of an unhealthy diet including vision and circulation problems due to her diabetes, I knew it was time to take a serious look at my own diet. Through Weight Watchers and a lot of family support, I have lost 75 pounds and am still on my way to my goal weight. Nutrition and exercise are no longer words I avoid.”

National Nutrition Month® is in March. It is a nutrition education and information campaign created by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics to focus on the importance of making informed food choices and developing sound eating and physical activity habits.
This year’s theme is “Go Further with Food” and focuses on the many different lifestyles of Americans and specific food requirements for those lifestyles. According to registered dietician Jim White, of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, there’s no one diet that is right for everyone. “It’s important to follow a healthful eating plan that’s packed with tasty foods and that keeps your unique lifestyle in mind,” said White.

For example, if you live an on-the-go lifestyle, like many Americans, it is important to plan ahead and pack fresh fruits or vegetables to eat throughout the day. Don’t assume that you can find the healthy choice you need at a restaurant nearby. Check the menu first.
Athletes should eat protein-filled food like peanut butter and yogurt, in order to have the fuel they need for their daily activities.
Students should turn to the healthy options in their school cafeteria like baked chicken and the salad bar. Avoid the popular favorites like French fries and other fried foods.

Vegetarians and vegans should include protein-rich foods like beans, lentils, nuts and soy products.  Because lifestyles vary so widely from person to person, White recommends seeking the guidance of a registered dietician to develop a food plan that’s right for you. Find a registered dietitian in your area by visiting www.eatright.org.

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