Hello Everybody!  Monday, November the 13th, the VRS Job Readiness group was once again out and about in the community. They visited Portrait on a Plate Catering, located in Austell, Georgia. These opportunities for hands on experiences provide insights into possible career paths as well as reinforcing daily living skills such as cooking, arranging transportation and time management.  VRS and our clients truly appreciate these outings and events.  So enjoy the following…

Upon our arrival, De’astin introduced us to our hosts, Chef Mark and Chef James. The Chefs of Portrait on a PlateAs soon as we walked in, the chefs had our group sit down at the kitchen table, after which they served us some delicious appetizers: warm, tenderly-cooked meatballs and Chicken wings marinated in a honey curry sauce.

While we ate, Jamie gave our hosts a chance to learn about how the visually impaired operate at the dinner table. You see, because most of us have problems with our eyesight, Jamie informed us of the location of our utensils and drinking glasses by describing them as if they were placed upon a clock’s face. Next, to confirm the location of these objects, Jamie told us to use our sense of touch to determine which items are in front of us. Afterwards, so that every participant would know who they were sitting next to, Jamie had each of us call out our names (kind of like playing Marco Polo without a pool). Our hosts were quick learners, and upon witnessing Jamie’s demonstration, Chef Mark and Chef James immediately adopted her methodology- how helpful!

After finishing the appetizer, we gathered around the kitchen’s L-shaped cooking counter, The Cooking Stationtied on our aprons, and began learning how to cook Chicken Cordon Bleu. Chicken Cordon BleuChef James- our cooking instructor for the day- guided us patiently throughout every stage of the cooking process.  For instance, he showed us how to avoid injuring our fingers while chopping vegetables by demonstrating the “Tiger Paw” technique. (Our fingers thank you!) James also allowed us to hold and smell every ingredient in the recipe. That way, even the folks with the least amount of useable vision available could tell them apart. Additionally, James and Mark allowed each person to contribute to the cooking process by handing everyone either a meat tenderizer, a knife, or a bowl of seasoning. This part was especially fun, because Derrick and William got to release some of their pent-up emotions by pounding the living daylights out a chicken breast.  More importantly, however, both Chef Mark and Chef James trusted each member of the JR group to complete their tasks safely, and we truly appreciate such trust and kindness.

In fact, the staff members at Portrait on a Plate were extremely kind and accommodating throughout our entire visit. For instance, not only did they provide us with refreshments and music while we ate, but the chefs also closed their business to the public on October 13th, all so that they could teach our Job Readiness class how to cook as a favor to the Vision Rehabilitation Services of Georgia.  The staff members refused to charge the JR group for either the meals or the cooking lesson that they gave us.   (Maybe, they can write it off as charity during tax season.) The Job Readiness Participants didn’t even have to worry about cleaning up their work stations or washing dishes when the class was finished- and let me tell you, a bunch of low-sighted cooks can make quite a mess in the kitchen.

To show our appreciation for their generosity, the Job Readiness group members agreed to recommend Portrait on a Plate to everyone on Facebook and Twitter, along with any of the other 70 million identical social media websites. Additionally, Jamie and the JR participants were happy to answer any questions that the chefs had regarding the signs which accompany certain visual disorders, the types of sports open to people with visual impairments, or the percentage of students who were born with low vision, as opposed to those who acquired their visual impairments later in life.

For instance, according to Jamie, vision problems manifest in many different ways. So, if you experience dizziness, vision problems or headaches, then you probably drink too much. Nonetheless, if these problems continue, you should see a doctor as soon as possible.  Finally, after their questions had been answered, the Job Readiness participants bid farewell to our hosts, before heading back to the VRS office to be picked up.

VRS_Volunteers_Portrait_on_A_Plate_Group_picOn behalf of Vision Rehabilitation Services of Georgia, we would all like to thank Chef Mark and Chef James for providing us with delicious food, valuable cooking tips, as well as a wonderful dining experience overall. Whether you are desperately searching for someone to cater your next party, or simply looking for a cooking instructor that can make learning both safe and fun, you can’t go wrong with Portrait on A Plate Catering!

Finally, a special thank you to Mr. Wayman, Beth Shaw, and Bob Shaw of the Lion’s club who drove us to Portrait on a Plate Catering on Monday. You people are real life savers. (We really mean that: the buses won’t go to that part of Austell, and you don’t want a bunch of people who have visual impairments attempting to drive themselves.)

 

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