Seasons Greetings & Happy Holidays

Vision Rehabilitation Services of GA wishes each and every one of you very Happy Holidays!  May the time you spend with family and friends warm your hearts and remain with you always.  VRS looks forward to the New Year and being able to serve our clients and their families.  We also appreciate our sponsors and supporters in all they do to help our efforts.

In observance of the Holidays, VRS will be closing at 1pm ET today.  We will remain closed Monday, December 25th, and Tuesday, December 26th.  We will reopen, Wednesday, December 27th!

Four-Part Christmas Plan For Diabetics

Christmas bellsIt’s the Christmas season and those with diabetes should approach the season with thoughtful planning in order to maintain healthy blood sugar levels and keep up with hard-earned healthy habits.  Creating a four-part plan for eating, drinking, traveling and activity at Christmas is one strategy recommended by the American Diabetes Association.  VRS instructors can assist you in developing your holiday plan – feel free to contact us at any time with questions:

Holiday Eating Plan:

American holidays are typically celebrated with excess food, so it is important to have an eating plan for maintaining healthy glucose levels Holiday Eating plan graphicthroughout the season.

  • Communicate your dietary needs to the event host
  • Offer to bring healthy alternatives to add to the menu
  • Have a high protein snack earlier in the day to avoid arriving hungry at the event

How to cut calories, without compromising on taste:

  • Remove the skin and eat light-colored meat (breast) rather than dark meat (thigh)
  • Make low-carb pigs in a blanket. Use low-fat cocktail sausages and pierce the skins. Instead of wrapping in bread, wrap with lean back-bacon (with the excess fat trimmed off) and grill. Do not fry or bake
  • Roast your potatoes; minimize fat by dry-roasting or using spray oil
  • Use vegetarian sausage rather than high-fat, high-calorie sausage meat in your stuffing
  • Keep to the healthy plate rule: 2/3 of your plate should be vegetables
  • Be extra cautious with dessert. Check out this link for dessert ideas. https://www.rd.com/food/recipes-cooking/diabetes-friendly-holiday-desserts/

If you have a higher blood glucose level than normal due to overindulging or changing your routine; don’t worry too much as this shouldn’t affect your long-term diabetes control.  Do aim to avoid persistently high readings in order to avoid compromising your hard-earned healthy habits.

Holiday Drinking Guidelines:

Holiday Drinking guidelines graphicAlcohol intake can lower blood glucose levels and increase the risk of a hypoglycemia incident.  Check with your doctor or pharmacist regarding how your prescriptions interact with alcohol and adjust your intake accordingly.

  • Diabetic men should have a maximum of 3-4 units of alcohol
  • Diabetic women a maximum of 2-3 units
  • Alternate between alcoholic and diet soft drinks or water can help limit the amount of alcohol you consume and keep you hydrated
  • Reduce calories and alcohol units by consuming lower strength wine
  • Do not to drink on an empty stomach – this can cause a low blood sugar event

Holiday Travel Tips:

Travelling with diabetes requires some extra planning and, at times, extra luggage!  List the items needed for your journey; keep an extra copy on your device or with a loved-one.

Travel Tips graphic

  • Always take extra supplies in case of an emergency
  • Plan for the unexpected: storm and airline delays may require longer stays
  • Bring extra insulin, meters, strips, pump supplies, alcohol wipes and Skin Tac wipes. You may also want to bring additional ketone urine strips. Use a Frio or other cooling bag for carrying insulin.
  • If you are flying, plan for extra time to go through security
  • Get a medical note saying you are allowed to carry diabetes- related supplies onto the airplane
  • Carry all of your supplies onto the plane – just in case
  • Divide supplies between bags, perhaps between other family members, in case a bag gets lost
  • Find out about special precautions from your insulin pump company Most insulin pumps and CGMs cannot be removed and sent through the x-ray machine.
  • Wear a medical ID necklace or bracelet
  • Carry a list of your doctors’ phone numbers with you
  • Have a back-up plan. Always carry syringes even if you are on a pump; if your pump fails you will be okay
  • Carry Ziplock bags in case something needs to be put in ice so it doesn’t get all wet (such as a pump or insulin bottles)
  • Carry candy, granola bars, glucose tabs, and other low blood sugar foods
  • Carry extra batteries for your pump/meter if needed

 

Keeping Active during the Holidays:Keeping active graphic

There are lots of easy and fun ways to add in some extra physical activities during the holiday season.  Grab a family member up off the couch and check some of these off your list:

  • Take a brisk walk with your family after your holiday meal.
  • Dance to holiday music.
  • Go ice skating at a local or pop up ice rink.
  • Shoot a few hoops
  • Enjoy the colors or smells with a holiday hike
  • Walk the neighborhood and look at lights
  • Take a caroling walk in the neighborhood

Introducing activity into your holiday season can help control both blood sugar levels and blood pressure.  It also helps us make memories with our families and friends that will last a lifetime. Take some time to make your plan for staying healthy over the holiday season and then go enjoy!

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Happy Thanksgiving!

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Vision Rehabilitation Services of GA wishes a very Happy Thanksgiving to one and all!  As families and friends gather and share past memories while making new ones, we at VRS wish you a day of happiness and gratefulness.  We are thankful for our clients and the ability to assist when needed.  Our capability to be there for our clients is not possible without our sponsors and supporters who we are very appreciative to and thankful for having.  With much gratitude, Happy Thanksgiving!

In observance of Thanksgiving, VRS will be closed Thursday, November 23rd, and Friday, November 24th.  We will reopen, Monday, November 27th!

November is American Diabetes Month – Did you know…

November is American Diabetes Month, a month set aside to educate the general public about this serious, and sometimes debilitating disease. One of the leading causes of disability and death in the United States, diabetes can cause blindness, nerve damage, kidney disease, and other health problems if it’s not controlled.

Diabetes#1causeofblindnessOne in 10 Americans have diabetes — that’s more than 30 million people. Another 84 million adults in the United States are at high risk of developing type 2 diabetes.

Fortunately, people who are at high risk for type 2 diabetes can lower their risk by more than half if they make healthy changes in their life – such as eating healthy, getting more physical activity, and losing weight. Those with diabetes in their family tree should be especially aggressive about making these changes as the risk of diabetes increases dramatically based on genetics.

Here are some tips for “tackling” Thanksgiving, football, and diabetes:

One of the most important considerations for those of us managing our diabetes or similar health issues, is to keep your blood sugars balanced during the day. Stable blood sugars ensure that your visual functioning remains consistent and at its best. The most effective way to balance blood sugars is to eat vegetables and proteins. So, on Thanksgiving Day, plan to eat small balanced meals at your regular meal times –breakfast and lunch –before the big dinner meal. Enjoy your Thanksgiving dinner by eating small portions of the food available for the meal. Leave the leftovers. Go back to your normal healthy eating the next day. It’s also an excellent idea to get up and move a little. Take an after meal walk and reminisce with loved ones,  stand up, stretch, and move during commercial breaks of the football and basketball games or better yet, go outside and toss the football yourself with the kids!

Even if you are already a diabetic, you can limit the progression and impact of the disease by carefully monitoring your health and following your doctor’s plan of action to diligently treat your diabetes. Further information about the prevention and treatment of this disease can be found on the American Diabetes Association website at www.diabetes.org.

VRS benefits from Whitefield Great Day of Service

VRS benefits from Whitefield Great Day of Service

Vision Rehabilitation Services of Georgia extends a big “THANK YOU” to Whitefield Academy and the great work completed at the office this past Saturday, August 26th.  Whitfield Academy students and parents revamped the flower beds are VRS entrance as part of their Great Day of Service.

Picture of the Whitefield GroupWhitefield launched Whitefield Great Day of Service just this month.  They shared “This event is centered on coming together as a Pack and starting off the school year with a focus on “others ahead of self.””  When asked “Why is Whitefield starting a Great Day of Service?”  They responded, “We want to create a way for the entire Whitefield community to come together as a family and focus on “others ahead of self” as we start a new school year. There’s no better way to center our hearts and minds on Christ than to serve others! Our goal is to make this an annual tradition at the beginning of each school year.”
“VRS is blessed by their service and have a partnership of many years with Whitfield Academy.  They did a beautiful job on the flowers and we are most appreciative” Sharon Croyle, VRS CEO/Executive Director, stated.
Flowerbed 1
Flowerbed 2
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Graduation Picture of Transition Participants

Summer Transition Academy Volunteer & Graduation Day

On Tuesday, July 25, 2017, the Transition Academy was hosted by MUST Ministries’ Marietta location.   Founded in 1971 by the Rev. Wayne Williams, MUST “…addresses the basic needs of individuals, families and children with facilities in the Cobb and Cherokee counties and programs in numerous other counties.”  MUST’s mission is “Serving our neighbors in need… transforming lives and communities in response to Christ’s call.”  Being a volunteer-driven organization, the Transition Academy was able to volunteer while simultaneously learning about job tasks, running a non-profit organization, meeting deadlines, and much more.  It was a great way to end the summer academy and a wonderful location to hold the Transition Academy Graduation.

From left to right, Chuck,Kelly,Aleayah, and Francis from MUST

MUST Program Team – Chuck, Kelly, Aleayah, and Francis

The morning kicked off with the members of the Transition Academy introducing themselves to our hosts (the Program Team), by giving a brief spontaneous Eye Statement to describe how their visual impairment works.   For instance, Alsu explained to the Program Team that having Septo-optic dysplasia, means that she sees best in dimly lit environments.   Afterwards, the Program Team responded to our introductions by telling the TA participants about the history of MUST Ministries, before outlining some of their own daily job duties.

Kelly supervises the people who work at MUST Ministries as part of their community service.   Usually, Kelly and her team handle the janitorial and house-keeping tasks for MUST Ministries, but they also keep the food pantry stocked.  Chuck oversees the Thrift Store, which provides a source of revenue for all of MUST Ministries’ programs.  Francis, the program director, shared MUST Ministries is a 46-year-old faith-based organization, whose mission is to serve their neighbors in need by providing both impoverished families and individuals with the goods and services they need.

The Transition Academy group broke into several small teams to aid the employees of MUST Ministries by stocking the shelves, handing out food in the pantry, and organizing the Thrift Store (among other things).   For example, Brittany, Ayesha, and Skylar took turns steaming the children’s clothes and hanging them on a cart.   Then, after the clothes had been steamed, Maggie and Gabby would take the cart to the thrift store.   At the thrift store, Chuck showed them how to organize the clothes, for ease of shopper,s based on gender and size from infant through adult.  Many volunteer hours are helpful in the store to keep it organized and stocked.

Josh Marks

Josh Marks

Josh Marks was interviewed for this week’s Transition Academy blog post.   Josh is currently a rising Junior at Lassiter High School, in Marietta, Georgia.   Josh’s preferred method of learning is through using a combination of audio and visual sensory input.    After graduating high school, Josh hopes to major in Sports Medicine at Kennesaw State University.   This would be an ideal situation, because one of Josh’s main interests is playing baseball.

Graduation Ceremony Ayesha, Gabby, , Cheylah, Alsu, Xavier, Jason, William, Rafa, and Gus

Graduation Ceremony Ayesha, Gabby, , Cheylah, Alsu, Xavier, Jason, William, Rafa, and Gus

Later, in honor of our final class, the Transition Academy volunteers and members had a graduation celebration complete with cake! Each student also received a graduation certificate to signify that they had successfully completed the course.

The afternoon was spent rotating through additional work stations.   TA participants unpacked donated work shirts, re-stacked donation boxes, re-stocked the food pantry and unloaded donations for the MUST summer lunch program.   In addition, a small group met with Linda Newman, past VRS Board Chair, to discuss strategies for preparing for the Math part of the SAT.   VRS is planning to host monthly test prep classes should program participants need additional support in this area.

During the last few minutes of our visit to MUST Ministries, the Program Team thanked every member of the Transition Academy for the volunteer help they provided and the tasks they accomplished.   Feedback was shared regarding things learned by both sides.    Class members were asked to stay-tuned for Next Step Prep activities throughout the school year.   As program participants prepared to leave MUST gave everyone a Gobble Jog T-Shirt to show their appreciation for all our hard work.  A reminder was provided to the TA group that a good training 5K in order to be ready for this year’s Gobble Jog is to participate in VRS’ 9th annual Spooktacular Chase in October!

Transition Academy Visits Local Businesses in the Community

Transition Academy Visits Local Businesses in the Community

On Tuesday, July 11, 2017, the Transition Academy (“TA”) visited an assisted living & memory care community in Smyrna, Provident Village at Creekside, and a local entrepreneur’s privately-owned framing business, Annie Frame Will Do.   The goals of the visits were to understand the various jobs and career opportunities available and practice the informational interview skills taught in TA.   By visiting a corporately structured entity and a privately owned & operated business on the same day, TA participants could compare and contrast different business approaches, skill sets required, risks, time commitments and rewards.

At Provident Village, following opening remarks, each TA member introduced themselves to the staff by discussing the details of their unique eye conditions and asking informational interview questions.   Through this question and answer period students were able to find out more about how an assisted living facility is operated.

The TA spoke with Allison Mosely and Carrie Chau, who are members of Provident’s sales and marketing team.  Their job is to intFrom left to right, Carrie Chau and Allison Moselyroduce potential residents to the Provident community.   Through organized special events and personalized appointments, Allison & Carrie get potential residents and their families excited about undergoing a lifestyle change and moving into Provident Village.  According to Carrie, Provident offers seniors a wide range of services.  These include cooking/dining, housekeeping, transportation, and entertaining social activities.   A key point is the residents of Provident retain the ability to make their own decisions about what they eat and how active a life they lead.  The sole exception to this rule concerns residents in the memory care area of the community who have a history of Dementia or Alzheimer’s and move into Provident Village specifically for a secure, structured, care taking environment.

The class also met Provident Village’s business manager (Natasha) who manages the community’s budget, processes paperwork for the new residents, bills the residents, and performs human resource duties for all the employees.  Once the explanations were finished, Natasha led thefrom left to right, Natasha and Nicky TA group on a tour of the building.  We saw many exciting sights such as the residential dining rooms, the library, and an entertainment center where the residents could watcfrom left to right, Elaine Austin and Allison Moselyh movies and eat popcorn.  In addition, the executive director (Elaine Austin) showed us the memory care unit.  We did not enter this secure area as it is locked & contains many alarms to prevent patients from accidentally wandering out of the building or becoming lost.  Other staff members who shared details of their positions and what it takes to keep Provident running efficiently and effectively included Nikki at the reception desk and front door; Carla from housekeeping; Penny the Activities Director; and Asia who is one of multiple chefs.

After lunch, the TA group bid the staff of Provident goodbye and rode to visit Ann Chamblee, a local entreprenuer.   Today, Ann runs her business from the basement of her house and averages a six day per week, ten-hour work day.   However, she used to be a business manager for the army.  While working for the army in Texas, Ann ran an arts and crafts center where she fell in love with framing.  So, after moving to Georgia, Ann started a business of her own, Annie Frame Will Do.Ann the owner of Annie Frame Will Do

Ann was very forthcoming with information when asked about how she creates frames, stocks inventory, and gains business.  She shared details about tracking the business expenses, planning for meeting deadlines, and how to create pricing structures.  The take away was the fact there is a lot to do when running your own business.

Ann’s business specializes in picture framing and framTA Students holding their t-shirts from Annie Frame Will Doe repair, but she has recently begun printing t-shirts as well.   The best part of the visit for most was getting the opportunity to see Ann create our Transition Academy t-shirts in her workshop using a fabric printer, a computer, and an iron.  She utilized the TA logo designed a few weeks back at the beginning of TA.  Annie was extremely generous so as to let us have the t-shirts free of charge.
All in all, the Transition Academy had a very full day and learned a lot.  We truly appreciate the support of these two businesses and the time spent with the class.

Eating IN the Library

Food Drink and Gum: VRS Transition Academy Did It All at the Library

On Tuesday, June 27, 2017, the Transition Academy (“TA”) took a field trip to the Georgia Library for Accessible Statewide Services (GLASS), located in Downtown Atlanta.  When the class first arrived, we were greeted warmly by Beverly, the manager of GLASS.  We were there to learn about services provided as well as observe and investigate various careers to consider at the library.  They allowed us to bring our coolers full of food and drinks for lunch as well as talk and laugh right there in the library.

GLASS employees (Jason, Diane and Vanessa) volunteered to show us different functions of the library program.  In reply, the TransitJason - GLASS employeeion Academy participants greeted our hosts by talking about our unique visual impairments and life experiences.   In turn, we learned that our GLASS instructors also have their own vision disorders and utilize multiple tools to perform their job duties and tasks.

The Transition class split into groups to conduct informational interviews with each employee and perform some job shadowing.  The day began with Jason, who oversees the BARD program.  BARD allows those who are visually impaired to access alternatively-formatted editions of their favorite books, by converting them into MP3 and Daisy audio files.  Jason mentioned that he could also download books straight to a patron’s cartridge or flash drive from a separate hard drive without relying oDiane - GLASS employeen the BARD software.  He even used his desktop to demonstrate how Bookshare can also convert text files into braille and audio formats.

Next, Diane demonstrated how she reviews the GLASS service applications utilizing a CCTV magnifier due to her own visual impairment.  Diane makes certain every applicant provides proof that they are blind, deaf, or otherwise physically disabled, because parents and teachers sometimes attempt to get their non-impaired students enrolled in GLASS, just to help them make it through schleft to right, Alsu, Maggie, Vanessa and Zoeool; taking away resources from those who genuinely need them.  Lastly, Vanessa taught everyone how to use CROSS- an interlibrary loan system- by allowing them to process some book order forms.

During lunch, Skylar interviewed Xavier Yancy for the Participant of the Week section of the TA blog.  Xavier is a rising freshman at Sprayberry High School, who learns best by observing others.  Xavier also has a passion for drawing and hopes to someday attend an Art College.  TXavier Yancyhough he doesn’t know what he hopes to attain by attending the Transition Academy, Xavier’ working goal is to eventually become a professional cartoonist.

After lunch, we explored the Tactile Exploration Area and played with the braille wall, Braille Wall at GLASSwhile we had some free time.  Finally, the TA participants showed their gratitude to Beverly and the other volunteers, by rolling up their sleeves and putting together some GLASS information packets.From front left to back right, Usher, Zoe, Alsu ,and Maggie - Copy

Group picture in Alpine Sign & Graphics Studio lobby

Transition Academy Learns About Branding At Alpine Sign & Graphics Studio

On Tuesday, June 20, 2017, the Transition Academy took a field trip to Steve Gardner’s Alpine Sign and Graphics Studio to learn about branding and logo creation.  Before we left, Nancy we began class with our usual introductions.  During that time, the class was introduced to Shelby- a visiting teacher from the Macon School for the Blind- who is interning with VRS as part of her O&M certification program.  Afterwards, we excitedly headed out on our adventure.

When we arrived, Steve Gardner met us in the lobby and explained several aspects of his business to us.  He shared how his business is an important part of a company’s branding strategy.  Mr. Gardner specializes in making vivid signs, banners, vehicle wraps, and interior graphics according to his customer’s unique specifications.  As a sample, Mr. Gardner showed us a Van Goh painting flawlessly reproduced on a miniature canvas frame, as well as a large wall graphic of the outdoors so realistic that several people nearly walked right into it.

Group listening to Steve Gardner explain printing

Inside his workshop, Mr. Gardner walked us through the process of creating a graphic, by pulling up the Transition Academy logo on his computer and printing it repeatedly on a large vinyl sheet.  Next, he ran the sheet through a slicing machine so that each adhesive logo sticker could be peeled off individually.Alsu_Chayla_Maggie_Xavier_reviewing_logo  Afterwards, Mr. Gardner used a pen knife to “weed” the excess white material on each logo, so that the stickers would look much neater when we used them later that day.

William YanceyUpon returning to VRS, Heidi and I chose to interview William Yancey, a recent graduate of Sprayberry High School, who came to the Transition Academy partly to get a free T-shirt.  In the fall, William plans to attend Chattahoochee Technical College.  After college, William would like a job where he could work with his hands and repair machines; fixing computers at Best Buy is just one of the many options available to him.  For the last major activity of the day, Nancy had the TA participants form an assembly line to create multisensory thank you cards for each of our special guests and visitors from the past few weeks.  Once those were finished, Julie, VRS’ Technology Instructor, introduced them to OrCam, a smart camera designed to help visually impaired read by using a special software that turns photos of written words into sounds that can be read back to the user.  Then at 3:30 PM, the class was finished for the day.

Sports Eye Safety

Little Hoopsters

With summer approaching, many people will be outside more often and involved in athletic activities which require extra eye protection, and the topic of Sports Eye Safety. According to the American Academy of Ophthalmology, the number of sports-related eye injuries in emergency rooms across the U.S. has significantly increased, with over 30,000 incidents per year!

While all sports involve an increased risk of eye injury, basketball, baseball, and air/paintball guns have the highest risk. Injuries can range from less threatening problems like minor corneal abrasions or bruises on the eye to vision-threatening internal injuries such as bleeding or retinal detachment. Sports-related eye injuries are avoidable with the proper protective eye wear.

Check with your coach or your child’s coach for details on the appropriate eyewear needed. For example, athletes playing basketball, racquet sports, soccer and field hockey should wear protective eyewear with poly-carbonate lenses.

Athletes who wear contacts or glasses should also wear appropriate protective eyewear. Contacts offer no protection and glasses do not provide enough defense. Also replace eye wear when it becomes weakened or yellowed as all products do with age. Finally, as always, whenever you plan to be outside in the sunlight, be sure to wear good sunglasses or glare control shades to protect your eyes from exposure to the sun.

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