Transition Academy Visits Local Businesses in the Community

Transition Academy Visits Local Businesses in the Community

On Tuesday, July 11, 2017, the Transition Academy (“TA”) visited an assisted living & memory care community in Smyrna, Provident Village at Creekside, and a local entrepreneur’s privately-owned framing business, Annie Frame Will Do.   The goals of the visits were to understand the various jobs and career opportunities available and practice the informational interview skills taught in TA.   By visiting a corporately structured entity and a privately owned & operated business on the same day, TA participants could compare and contrast different business approaches, skill sets required, risks, time commitments and rewards.

At Provident Village, following opening remarks, each TA member introduced themselves to the staff by discussing the details of their unique eye conditions and asking informational interview questions.   Through this question and answer period students were able to find out more about how an assisted living facility is operated.

The TA spoke with Allison Mosely and Carrie Chau, who are members of Provident’s sales and marketing team.  Their job is to intFrom left to right, Carrie Chau and Allison Moselyroduce potential residents to the Provident community.   Through organized special events and personalized appointments, Allison & Carrie get potential residents and their families excited about undergoing a lifestyle change and moving into Provident Village.  According to Carrie, Provident offers seniors a wide range of services.  These include cooking/dining, housekeeping, transportation, and entertaining social activities.   A key point is the residents of Provident retain the ability to make their own decisions about what they eat and how active a life they lead.  The sole exception to this rule concerns residents in the memory care area of the community who have a history of Dementia or Alzheimer’s and move into Provident Village specifically for a secure, structured, care taking environment.

The class also met Provident Village’s business manager (Natasha) who manages the community’s budget, processes paperwork for the new residents, bills the residents, and performs human resource duties for all the employees.  Once the explanations were finished, Natasha led thefrom left to right, Natasha and Nicky TA group on a tour of the building.  We saw many exciting sights such as the residential dining rooms, the library, and an entertainment center where the residents could watcfrom left to right, Elaine Austin and Allison Moselyh movies and eat popcorn.  In addition, the executive director (Elaine Austin) showed us the memory care unit.  We did not enter this secure area as it is locked & contains many alarms to prevent patients from accidentally wandering out of the building or becoming lost.  Other staff members who shared details of their positions and what it takes to keep Provident running efficiently and effectively included Nikki at the reception desk and front door; Carla from housekeeping; Penny the Activities Director; and Asia who is one of multiple chefs.

After lunch, the TA group bid the staff of Provident goodbye and rode to visit Ann Chamblee, a local entreprenuer.   Today, Ann runs her business from the basement of her house and averages a six day per week, ten-hour work day.   However, she used to be a business manager for the army.  While working for the army in Texas, Ann ran an arts and crafts center where she fell in love with framing.  So, after moving to Georgia, Ann started a business of her own, Annie Frame Will Do.Ann the owner of Annie Frame Will Do

Ann was very forthcoming with information when asked about how she creates frames, stocks inventory, and gains business.  She shared details about tracking the business expenses, planning for meeting deadlines, and how to create pricing structures.  The take away was the fact there is a lot to do when running your own business.

Ann’s business specializes in picture framing and framTA Students holding their t-shirts from Annie Frame Will Doe repair, but she has recently begun printing t-shirts as well.   The best part of the visit for most was getting the opportunity to see Ann create our Transition Academy t-shirts in her workshop using a fabric printer, a computer, and an iron.  She utilized the TA logo designed a few weeks back at the beginning of TA.  Annie was extremely generous so as to let us have the t-shirts free of charge.
All in all, the Transition Academy had a very full day and learned a lot.  We truly appreciate the support of these two businesses and the time spent with the class.

Eating IN the Library

Food Drink and Gum: VRS Transition Academy Did It All at the Library

On Tuesday, June 27, 2017, the Transition Academy (“TA”) took a field trip to the Georgia Library for Accessible Statewide Services (GLASS), located in Downtown Atlanta.  When the class first arrived, we were greeted warmly by Beverly, the manager of GLASS.  We were there to learn about services provided as well as observe and investigate various careers to consider at the library.  They allowed us to bring our coolers full of food and drinks for lunch as well as talk and laugh right there in the library.

GLASS employees (Jason, Diane and Vanessa) volunteered to show us different functions of the library program.  In reply, the TransitJason - GLASS employeeion Academy participants greeted our hosts by talking about our unique visual impairments and life experiences.   In turn, we learned that our GLASS instructors also have their own vision disorders and utilize multiple tools to perform their job duties and tasks.

The Transition class split into groups to conduct informational interviews with each employee and perform some job shadowing.  The day began with Jason, who oversees the BARD program.  BARD allows those who are visually impaired to access alternatively-formatted editions of their favorite books, by converting them into MP3 and Daisy audio files.  Jason mentioned that he could also download books straight to a patron’s cartridge or flash drive from a separate hard drive without relying oDiane - GLASS employeen the BARD software.  He even used his desktop to demonstrate how Bookshare can also convert text files into braille and audio formats.

Next, Diane demonstrated how she reviews the GLASS service applications utilizing a CCTV magnifier due to her own visual impairment.  Diane makes certain every applicant provides proof that they are blind, deaf, or otherwise physically disabled, because parents and teachers sometimes attempt to get their non-impaired students enrolled in GLASS, just to help them make it through schleft to right, Alsu, Maggie, Vanessa and Zoeool; taking away resources from those who genuinely need them.  Lastly, Vanessa taught everyone how to use CROSS- an interlibrary loan system- by allowing them to process some book order forms.

During lunch, Skylar interviewed Xavier Yancy for the Participant of the Week section of the TA blog.  Xavier is a rising freshman at Sprayberry High School, who learns best by observing others.  Xavier also has a passion for drawing and hopes to someday attend an Art College.  TXavier Yancyhough he doesn’t know what he hopes to attain by attending the Transition Academy, Xavier’ working goal is to eventually become a professional cartoonist.

After lunch, we explored the Tactile Exploration Area and played with the braille wall, Braille Wall at GLASSwhile we had some free time.  Finally, the TA participants showed their gratitude to Beverly and the other volunteers, by rolling up their sleeves and putting together some GLASS information packets.From front left to back right, Usher, Zoe, Alsu ,and Maggie - Copy

Group picture in Alpine Sign & Graphics Studio lobby

Transition Academy Learns About Branding At Alpine Sign & Graphics Studio

On Tuesday, June 20, 2017, the Transition Academy took a field trip to Steve Gardner’s Alpine Sign and Graphics Studio to learn about branding and logo creation.  Before we left, Nancy we began class with our usual introductions.  During that time, the class was introduced to Shelby- a visiting teacher from the Macon School for the Blind- who is interning with VRS as part of her O&M certification program.  Afterwards, we excitedly headed out on our adventure.

When we arrived, Steve Gardner met us in the lobby and explained several aspects of his business to us.  He shared how his business is an important part of a company’s branding strategy.  Mr. Gardner specializes in making vivid signs, banners, vehicle wraps, and interior graphics according to his customer’s unique specifications.  As a sample, Mr. Gardner showed us a Van Goh painting flawlessly reproduced on a miniature canvas frame, as well as a large wall graphic of the outdoors so realistic that several people nearly walked right into it.

Group listening to Steve Gardner explain printing

Inside his workshop, Mr. Gardner walked us through the process of creating a graphic, by pulling up the Transition Academy logo on his computer and printing it repeatedly on a large vinyl sheet.  Next, he ran the sheet through a slicing machine so that each adhesive logo sticker could be peeled off individually.Alsu_Chayla_Maggie_Xavier_reviewing_logo  Afterwards, Mr. Gardner used a pen knife to “weed” the excess white material on each logo, so that the stickers would look much neater when we used them later that day.

William YanceyUpon returning to VRS, Heidi and I chose to interview William Yancey, a recent graduate of Sprayberry High School, who came to the Transition Academy partly to get a free T-shirt.  In the fall, William plans to attend Chattahoochee Technical College.  After college, William would like a job where he could work with his hands and repair machines; fixing computers at Best Buy is just one of the many options available to him.  For the last major activity of the day, Nancy had the TA participants form an assembly line to create multisensory thank you cards for each of our special guests and visitors from the past few weeks.  Once those were finished, Julie, VRS’ Technology Instructor, introduced them to OrCam, a smart camera designed to help visually impaired read by using a special software that turns photos of written words into sounds that can be read back to the user.  Then at 3:30 PM, the class was finished for the day.

Sports Eye Safety

Little Hoopsters

With summer approaching, many people will be outside more often and involved in athletic activities which require extra eye protection, and the topic of Sports Eye Safety. According to the American Academy of Ophthalmology, the number of sports-related eye injuries in emergency rooms across the U.S. has significantly increased, with over 30,000 incidents per year!

While all sports involve an increased risk of eye injury, basketball, baseball, and air/paintball guns have the highest risk. Injuries can range from less threatening problems like minor corneal abrasions or bruises on the eye to vision-threatening internal injuries such as bleeding or retinal detachment. Sports-related eye injuries are avoidable with the proper protective eye wear.

Check with your coach or your child’s coach for details on the appropriate eyewear needed. For example, athletes playing basketball, racquet sports, soccer and field hockey should wear protective eyewear with poly-carbonate lenses.

Athletes who wear contacts or glasses should also wear appropriate protective eyewear. Contacts offer no protection and glasses do not provide enough defense. Also replace eye wear when it becomes weakened or yellowed as all products do with age. Finally, as always, whenever you plan to be outside in the sunlight, be sure to wear good sunglasses or glare control shades to protect your eyes from exposure to the sun.

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