November is American Diabetes Month – Did you know…

November is American Diabetes Month, a month set aside to educate the general public about this serious, and sometimes debilitating disease. One of the leading causes of disability and death in the United States, diabetes can cause blindness, nerve damage, kidney disease, and other health problems if it’s not controlled.

Diabetes#1causeofblindnessOne in 10 Americans have diabetes — that’s more than 30 million people. Another 84 million adults in the United States are at high risk of developing type 2 diabetes.

Fortunately, people who are at high risk for type 2 diabetes can lower their risk by more than half if they make healthy changes in their life – such as eating healthy, getting more physical activity, and losing weight. Those with diabetes in their family tree should be especially aggressive about making these changes as the risk of diabetes increases dramatically based on genetics.

Here are some tips for “tackling” Thanksgiving, football, and diabetes:

One of the most important considerations for those of us managing our diabetes or similar health issues, is to keep your blood sugars balanced during the day. Stable blood sugars ensure that your visual functioning remains consistent and at its best. The most effective way to balance blood sugars is to eat vegetables and proteins. So, on Thanksgiving Day, plan to eat small balanced meals at your regular meal times –breakfast and lunch –before the big dinner meal. Enjoy your Thanksgiving dinner by eating small portions of the food available for the meal. Leave the leftovers. Go back to your normal healthy eating the next day. It’s also an excellent idea to get up and move a little. Take an after meal walk and reminisce with loved ones,  stand up, stretch, and move during commercial breaks of the football and basketball games or better yet, go outside and toss the football yourself with the kids!

Even if you are already a diabetic, you can limit the progression and impact of the disease by carefully monitoring your health and following your doctor’s plan of action to diligently treat your diabetes. Further information about the prevention and treatment of this disease can be found on the American Diabetes Association website at www.diabetes.org.

Breast Cancer Awareness Continues

Just as the trees start to turn their glorious shades of orange and red, everywhere you look another glorious color emerges– Pink! From pink-clad legs of our soccer-playing kids to the teens sporting hair dyed in shades of pink we never knew existed – it’s clear that Breast Cancer Awareness is upon us! When asked why their team was wearing pink socks last week, I overheard a 10-year old boy explain that his teammate’s mom has breast cancer and they wanted to make her feel loved. Pink is everywhere and it’s not surprising to hear such statistics as: about 1 in 8 women born today in the United States will get breast cancer at some point in their life.

Fortunately, just like my soccer mom friend, if found and treated early, most women can survive breast cancer, which makes all the pink and public awareness campaigns even more important. Know the risk and follow directions for proper and timely screenings.

The most important screening tool for early detection of breast cancer is a mammogram; an x-ray of the breast. Doctors recommend that women should start annual mammograms at age 40. If a woman has a family history of breast or ovarian cancer, she may want to consider starting mammograms earlier.  After menopause is complete, women can lengthen the time between mammograms to once every two years. Take time to look at the risk assessment link below to better understand your personal risk factors: https://www.cancer.gov/bcrisktool/

It is also recommended that women do a self-examination of each breast monthly, beginning at the onset of their menstrual cycle. If you notice any changes in your breasts, contact your doctor for an appointment immediately.

It is not commonly known that breast cancer can occur in men; over 2,000 men are diagnosed each year. If you are male and notice a change in the breast or nipple area, or feel a lump or hard spot there, see your doctor immediately.

Finally, what better way to support those who are managing their disease then to participate in a breast cancer walk in your community. You can enjoy the glorious fall weather, the beautiful changing colors and create your own stylin’ Pink outfit to dazzle your friends! Websites such as the American Cancer Society or other cancer non-profit organizations also welcome your support through donations and other volunteer opportunities.

Childhood Obesity Creates Risk for Chronic Diseases

Childhood obesity is an epidemic that is impacting the health and wellness of  millions of children. To bring attention to this critical situation, September was deemed National Childhood Obesity Awareness Month, a month to reflect on the problem of childhood obesity in America.  Although September has come and gone we must continue to reflect on the problem of childhood obesity and how to stop it.

The Facts

The percentage of children with obesity in the United States has more than tripled since the 1970s. In fact, one in 3 children in the United States are overweight or obese putting children at a higher risk for chronic diseases once only seen in adults, like diabetes. There are increasing incidences of diabetes among obese youth which can lead to eye disease and vision loss. In addition to diabetes, children with obesity are at higher risk for other health conditions such as heart disease, asthma, sleep apnea, and bone/joint problems.

Growth Charts

Health professionals use growth charts to see whether a child’s weight falls into a healthy range for the child’s height, age, and sex. Children with a BMI (Body Mass Index) above the 85th percentile and less than the 95th percentile are considered overweight. BMI percentile is preferred for measuring children and young adults (ages 2–20), rather than weight, because it takes into account that they are still growing, and growing at different rates depending on their age and sex.

Bullying and Teasing

Besides the physical health risks, it has been found that children with obesity are bullied and teased more than their normal-weight peers and are more likely to suffer from social isolation, depression, and low self-esteem. The effects of bullying can result in poor performance in school, mental health issues,  and addictions. These effects can have lifelong impact on the child’s self image and future prospects.

Childhood Obesity is Preventable

The most important thing to know about child obesity is that it can be prevented. It is important to tackle the issue as soon as possible, under a doctor’s guidance, and without drawing unnecessary and prolonged attention to the child’s physical appearance. In the long term, childhood obesity is associated with having obesity as an adult, which is linked to serious conditions and diseases.

Spread Awareness

Encourage the families you know to be aware of the risks related to childhood obesity and take their child’s weight and fitness seriously. Advise them to make small changes, like keeping fresh fruit, instead of high caloric snacks, within reach for after school snacks. Commit as a family to physical activity, like going on a family walk after dinner instead of watching a favorite television show. Make physical fitness and healthy eating a natural part of your lifestyle. If you are a grandparent, forego giving traditional “grandparent” like fresh-baked cookies, cake, and chocolate on a regular basis. Instead, keep these items as infrequent treats and keep your own home stocked with healthy food choices for their visits. Ensuring our children have healthy habits helps motivates us to make better life choices as well!

Attention ALL Adults – Have you had your immunizations?

Living Well with Diabetes and Vision Loss is a United Way of Metropolitan Atlanta sponsored program run by VRS. Each month we work to provide information that we feel is helpful to those living with diabetes and vision loss.

Diabetes is a metabolic disorder that affects how the body uses food for energy due to insulin resistance. Diabetes affects the metabolism as well as the immune system. The disease causes the immune system to destroy insulin producing cells within the pancreas. The immune response is also much lower in people who have diabetes so they are more susceptible to getting infections that could result in the loss of a limb.

Many of us will remember the days of toting our children to the doctor to get their recommended immunizations and protect them from various diseases. As adults, however, we often neglect much needed vaccinations which are recommended and help prevent dangerous and sometimes deadly diseases. To stay protected against serious illnesses, adults need to get vaccinated too. Shots such as the flu vaccine, are recommended annually for all adults and other shots such as the pneumonia or Shingles vaccine may also be recommended by your doctor.

Take this short quiz below to determine what shots you may need to take, then talk to your doctor about each. Don’t neglect the steps you need to take to be at optimal health.

The Adult Vaccine Quiz from the CDC: https://www2.cdc.gov/nip/adultImmSched/

To stay healthy this winter also be sure to eat well, get some exercise and plenty of sleep. The immune system fights best for you when it is healthy and taken care of. Allow for time with family or friends playing games or sharing stories and leisure activities. Laugh a lot. Our emotional health is tied directly to our immune system and when we feel a part of a community our immune system works its best.

Eclipse Soundscapes Project

Eclipse Soundscapes Project

 

Have you wondered how the visually impaired and others who can’t use their own eyes to see Monday, August 21st’s Eclipse will be affected and engaged?  Did you hear about the project from NASA’s Heliophysics Education Consortium?  To find out answers to these questions VRS is reproducing information here so please enjoy and share with others…

Quoted text follows:

On August 21, 2017, millions of people will view a total solar eclipse as it passes through the United States. However, for the visually impaired, or others who are unable to see the eclipse with their own eyes, the Eclipse Soundscapes Project delivers a multisensory experience of this exciting celestial event. The project, from NASA’s Heliophysics Education Consortium, will include audio descriptions of the eclipse in real time, recordings of the changing environmental sounds during the eclipse, and an interactive “rumble map” app that will allow users to visualize the eclipse through touch.

During an eclipse, we gaze in amazement as day becomes night. But, along  with the striking visual effects,  the soundscape of natural environments changes dramatically.   The changes in the sounds of the eclipse are not only of interest to sociologists, birders,  and naturalists, but will also give the blind and visually impaired an opportunity to experience this rare celestial event.

The Eclipse Soundscapes project will use a specially designed app to allow citizen scientists to record environmental sounds before, during, and after the August 21, 2017 eclipse.  These recordings will be shared across the world in order to give everyone the opportunity to experience the awe of a total solar eclipse.

Join our project: https://goo.gl/forms/lu8CkUcbxHMIdZw12

Thanks to our partners

Smithsonian  https://www.si.edu/

NASA https://www.nasa.gov/

HEC

Contact us: info@eclipsesoundscapes.org

Eclipse Soundscapes Project

c/o Henry “Trae” Winter, MS 58

Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics

60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 USA

 

Follow Us:

Twitter, https://twitter.com/EclipseSoundSAO

Facebook, https://www.facebook.com/EclipseSoundSAO/

Instagram, https://www.instagram.com/eclipsesoundscapes/

Eclipse Mob, http://www.eclipsemob.org/

 

Article from The Economist – White Cane 2.0

Interesting article from The Economist regarding White Cane alternative.

This article appeared in the Science and technology section of the print edition under the headline “White cane 2.0”

Helping blind people navigate

White cane 2.0

A new way to assist those with poor eyesight

Dr Rus’s device, of which she demonstrated a prototype on June 1st at the International Conference on Robotics and Automation in Singapore, consists of a camera worn on a lanyard around the neck, and a belt. A computer inside the camera creates a three-dimensional image of the area ahead of the wearer, processes it to extract relevant information, and uses the results to pass on appropriate signals via the belt.

Dr Rus knew from previous attempts to build devices of this sort that what might seem the obvious way of manifesting those signals, namely as sounds with specific meanings, was not, in fact, a good approach. Blind people depend a lot on their hearing and do not like it when newfangled devices hamper this sense with beeps and clicks. Hence the belt, which has five vibrating motors installed in it. One sits over the centre of the wearer’s abdomen. The others flank this central motor, with two spaced out on either side of it.

That configuration permits the computer to warn a wearer when he is on a collision course with an obstacle. It does so by telling the motor pointing most closely in the direction of the obstacle to vibrate. If the wearer is walking towards a wall, for example, the central motor vibrates softly when he comes within a couple of metres of it. If he ignores this, perhaps because he actually wants to reach the wall, the computer increases the amplitude as he closes in, giving him a good idea of exactly how far away he is. Similarly, if he is in danger of bumping, say, his right shoulder on a door frame while walking from one room to another, the right-most motor on the belt will warn him of the impending collision. And it works. When compared with navigation by white cane in one of MIT’s famously crowded hallways, it reduced blind students’ collisions with others by 86%.

The new system can, however, do more than just help someone walk around without collisions, for the belt incorporates a touchpad that is inscribed with instructions in Braille. This permits the user to program it to perform specific tasks.

For example, Dr Rus knew that blind students often struggle to find an empty seat in a crowded lecture theatre. Adding an appropriate algorithm to the computer’s software helps get around this by enabling it to recognise chairs, and also whether or not a chair is occupied. In this case, the motors are used to indicate a direction to be travelled in, rather than one to be avoided. Activating the algorithm using the touchpad causes the motor pointing most closely towards an empty chair to vibrate when the system spots one.

Good vibrations

In trials involving a room that contained an empty chair, an occupied chair and also a recycling bin, the algorithm directed the belt-wearer straight to the empty chair 80% of the time. Cane users presented with the same arrangement always found the empty chair eventually, but in doing so came into contact with objects other than their target more than five times as often as those using the camera and belt.

Whether a camera (ideally, smaller than the one in the prototype) and a belt could replace a cane completely remains to be seen. In particular, Dr Rus’s system does lack one important feature of Biggs’s innovation. A white cane not only helps a blind person to navigate, it also signals his condition to the rest of the world, allowing others to adjust their behaviour accordingly. As a supplementary aid, however, her approach seems most promising.

VRS Hosts Summer Transition Academy for Metro Atlanta

Transition Academy

On Tuesday, June 06, 2017, VRS began holding its first annual Transition Academy. The purpose of the Transition Academy is to teach the participants various skills that they can apply both in their daily lives and in the workplace. Not limited to any age group or region, the Transition Academy teaches students from all over the Metro Atlanta area. From middle school and high school, to college and beyond, anyone with a visual impairment is welcome.

From left to right, Jason's father, William and Gus

To begin, the participants gave a short introduction which told the other students their names and passions. Then they explored their own personal learning styles by taking a test that links personality traits with colors; these colors, in turn, correspond to a learning style. Afterwards, the participants divided into groups tasked with learning and performing various tasks that are important, both in the workplace and in daily life.

Gabby ( left) and Karly (right)

In the kitchen Rafa, Gabriel, and Xavier were tasked with preparing lunch for the class; a teacher gave the boys instructions, while Gabby and Karly wrote down food orders from the other participants and delivered them to the kitchen. Meanwhile, Gus and William were taught how to clean using their sense of touch and the reliable grid pattern. Next, they went outside to wash the windows with vinegar. After a demonstration to Cheyla and Maggie how to fold t-shirts, which is a skill that -in addition to being vital in the workplace- can be applied while doing laundry or organizing clothes at home. The folding team will also get to use their skills by volunteering at the Must Ministries shop in the coming weeks.

in back, Jamie and Maggie, in front, Cheyla

Finally, the reporters (Heidi, Jason, and Skylar), and authors of the Academy’s Blog, kept track of the class by taking notes and participating in the different activities. Then they selected Augustu “Gus” Pacleb as the student of the week, and Jason interviewed him. Gus attends Forsyth Central High School and, just like Heidi, he found out that his learning styles correspond to both the blue (harmonious) and green (logical) learning styles. Overall, Gus thought that his scores were accurate and he hopes that this new insight into his personality will allow him to find a job that suits his learning style, while also enabling him to work well with his future colleagues.

Jason VRS Transition Academy

 

Ultra-Important Facts On Ultraviolet Rays

Sunglasses

Ultra-violet (UV) rays can damage your eyes and increase your risk of cataracts and cancers of the eye. Because UV rays can be permanently harmful, sunglasses with UV protection are recommended for everyone, but especially for those that work outside or already have existing eye problems.

While many have heard of the dangers of skin cancer, few people know that various skin cancers (basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinomas, melanomas) can occur on the eyelids, on the surface of the eye and even inside of the eye. In fact, 5-10% of skin cancer affects the eyelids.  Our eyes are the only internal tissue of our body that are exposed to sunlight. Without proper sunglasses, nearly 40% of the rays get into our eyes even when we’re not directly exposed. Ocular melanoma cancer is the most common type of eye cancer in adults and can cause permanent vision loss. Around 94% of people are affected with premature aging signs near the eye regions. This is also caused by exposure to intense sun rays that make your skin dry. This affects the skin texture and makes it more prone to get wrinkles and fine lines.

For these reasons, it is essential to protect your eyes from harmful UV rays by regularly wearing protective sunglasses. Sunglasses should be 100% UV-absorbent for UVA and UVB or be labeled UV400. To provide additional UV protection, also wear a wide-brimmed hat, especially when during the mid-day sun or if you will be outdoors for a prolonged period of time.

Remember, prolonged UV exposure can occur outside, but also in tanning beds. People who are fair-skinned, Caucasians, have light-colored eyes, smoke, or have had a family history of skin cancer are particularly at risk and sensitive to UV rays.

Parents should also be extra cautious with their children’s activities such as swimming or skiing because the sun is reflected off the water, snow, or ice and heavy UV exposure can occur without even realizing it.

Regular dilated eye exams, especially in high risk patients, can provide early warnings, diagnosis, and treatment of the aforementioned eye diseases and prevent or treat these eye diseases related to UV exposure.

For more information check out: Think About Your Eyes

Sports Eye Safety

Little Hoopsters

With summer approaching, many people will be outside more often and involved in athletic activities which require extra eye protection, and the topic of Sports Eye Safety. According to the American Academy of Ophthalmology, the number of sports-related eye injuries in emergency rooms across the U.S. has significantly increased, with over 30,000 incidents per year!

While all sports involve an increased risk of eye injury, basketball, baseball, and air/paintball guns have the highest risk. Injuries can range from less threatening problems like minor corneal abrasions or bruises on the eye to vision-threatening internal injuries such as bleeding or retinal detachment. Sports-related eye injuries are avoidable with the proper protective eye wear.

Check with your coach or your child’s coach for details on the appropriate eyewear needed. For example, athletes playing basketball, racquet sports, soccer and field hockey should wear protective eyewear with poly-carbonate lenses.

Athletes who wear contacts or glasses should also wear appropriate protective eyewear. Contacts offer no protection and glasses do not provide enough defense. Also replace eye wear when it becomes weakened or yellowed as all products do with age. Finally, as always, whenever you plan to be outside in the sunlight, be sure to wear good sunglasses or glare control shades to protect your eyes from exposure to the sun.

Join our Book Club!

VRS is exciting to announce we are starting a New Monthly Book Club!

Book Club

Do you ever find it hard to get motivated to read, or maybe you love to read but would like to interact with your friends, well here is your opportunity! VRS is starting a book club. The idea to start a book club came from one of our clients, but is open to all clients and friends of the agency. Plus we will have audio books available as well for the visually impaired or blind readers. The first monthly book club will take place on April 3 from 2-3 p. m. We will have coffee too for our coffee drinkers in the club. If you are interested please RSVP to wayneheidi288@gmail.com or (770) 906-6797. Also if you have a favorite author or type of book include that in your email. We will see you in April! Happy Reading!

Accessibility
Close
Apply Now